soccer

Suppose you have cameras, and they stop the game after a goal scored from offside.I don’t think it’s feasible to stop the game after every offside signaling to check if it was really offside.But if the ball goes in the net,then the camera is useful.

But how about a situation where  there’s an offside,it’s not signaled,the game continues and 15 seconds later someone scores a legitimate goal?

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6 Responses to soccer

  1. Nate says:

    I’ve heard that rugby has already solved some of these problems, by having a separate replay referee with the authority to make calls (thereby allowing the flow of play to continue). And if a team was offside 15 seconds before scoring a goal, then I would question whether the goal was actually legitimate.

    Of course, all of this presumes that we can make sense of the idea of there being a correct, objective rule call beyond what the referee has determined. It’s my understanding that some members of this blog have challenged this assumption.

  2. Lime says:

    Nate writes, “Of course, all of this presumes that we can make sense of the idea of there being a correct, objective rule call beyond what the referee has determined. It’s my understanding that some members of this blog have challenged this assumption.”

    Who would deny this presumption? Rules require interpretation, obviously, but if there is a clear rule in place it generally isn’t too hard to make an “objective” claim about whether the rule has been followed. Perhaps some members of the blog would deny that the rules of soccer themselves are objective. That is, that if the rules of soccer were different, then the participants in the game must be irrational.

  3. David says:

    Ah, I love waking up and finding action on the blog.

    Nate writes: “Of course, all of this presumes that we can make sense of the idea of there being a correct, objective rule call beyond what the referee has determined. It’s my understanding that some members of this blog have challenged this assumption.”

    This was probably intended as a dig at me, as I seem to recall balking at the idea that it made much sense to say that Gallaraga “actually” threw a perfect game. In retrospect, I suspect I was in an argumentative and highly ‘positivist’ frame of mind, as it seems abundantly clear to me now that “actually threw a perfect game” is synonymous with “would have allowed no baserunners in a game officiated in accordance with the rules of baseball.” Nate probably said as much at the time, but it’s funny (not to mention ineffecient) how you have to figure these things out for yourself.

  4. Lime says:

    I should have guessed that David was to blame.

  5. juan says:

    Nate mentions a replay referee in rugby.I think that’s a good idea,but it still doesn’t solve the problem.The replay referee cannot stop the game all the time,only when it’s important.But what if,say,not 15 seconds,but 90 seconds or 2 minutes pass before a team scores a goal after an offside?Is that still not legitimate,because 2 minutes before an offside occurred?
    I tend to think that allowing the game to go on despite some minor mistake from the field referees legitimizes what is going on on the field and renders it fair.I think the team that scores a goal 90 seconds after an unsanctioned offside would be right to complain if the goal did not count.For what had they been doing for the last 90 seconds?Wasting effort or what?
    But that’s also why the 15 second case is harder, cause the actions are very close in time,so it’s hard to say what is to be done.Maybe Nate is right and that’s not a fair goal.

  6. Nates says:

    Juan, I agree there would be some messy situations. Perhaps one could limit the replay ref to only 30 seconds when the play is ongoing. That’s plenty of time to correct many routine missed calls, and, even if some missed calls remain uncorrected, it would still be a vast improvement over the current situation.

    Also, my new blog name is Nates with an ‘s’.

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